Commissioner Cagle Update

 
February 2022
Greetings!
 
As many of you know, a 3-2 majority on Commissioners Court recently passed a surprise redistricting plan based on a map released to the public only a few hours before its approval. That plan, which Precinct 3 Commissioner Tom S. Ramsey and I opposed, disrupts the lives of more than half our residents by changing the precincts of more than 2.3 million residents – mostly those of you in northern and western Harris County.
 
The decision prompted several lawsuits seeking to overturn the plan in favor of a less intrusive one that more closely mirrors our previous precinct lines. Although these lawsuits are still pending, Commissioner Ramsey and I now must begin the monumental task of moving on from decades-long partnerships to forge new ones in our new precincts.
 
I am R. Jack Cagle, your new county commissioner. As we begin work in your area, I want to assure you that I will continue providing the same exceptional service that you’ve come to expect. Your Precinct 4 team looks forward to building and maintaining your parks and roads and bringing many new events and activities to your area – from events for seniors and outdoor movie nights to live theater in your parks and community centers.
 
I encourage you to learn more about our programs at hcp4.net/events/. If you’d like to learn more about Precinct 4, please visit us online at hcp4.net and follow us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.
 
Please know that I proudly serve as your county commissioner, and I support the law-enforcement, health care, and other vital programs that make Harris County the best place to live, grow, and play.
 
Thank you.
 
 
 
If you do not want to receive messages from Commissioner Cagle, you may unsubscribe by clicking the link at the bottom of the email.

 

Answers to Your Redistricting FAQs

 
Where is Precinct 4?
 
Precinct 4 Commissioner R. Jack Cagle serves the approximately 1.2 million people living and working in western Harris County, from Tomball to Katy, down through Alief to the Fort Bend county line. Precinct 4 features 48 parks, including eight hike-and-bike trails, five community centers, two nature centers, an aquatics center, and two senior centers.
 
What is a commissioner and commissioners court?
 
The Texas Constitution establishes commissioners courts in every county. Each commissioners court is made up of a county judge and four commissioners and is the governing board of that county. Commissioners Court members create county-wide policies, adopt budgets, set property tax rates, authorize contracts, maintain county facilities, and more. Commissioners at the precinct level are constitutionally tasked with road and bridge maintenance, but many commissioners, like Commissioner Cagle, provide additional services. For more information, click here.
 
What services does my commissioner provide?
 
Commissioner Cagle takes a comprehensive approach to county government. His priorities include providing educational and recreational programs for residents and building and maintaining parks, trails, and roads. He helped pass Harris County’s strictest regulations on building in flood zones and worked to pass a $2.5 billion flood bond issue in 2018. After Hurricane Harvey, he created a rescue fleet capable of large debris removal and high-water rescues that is now available to west Harris County residents during emergencies. He also developed a Legacy Trees program to reduce flood risk and beautify communities through tree plantings. As part of the program, Precinct 4 donates historic trees with exciting stories to schools and nonprofits.
 
Why did my precinct change?
 
By a 3-2 vote, Harris County Commissioners Court approved a redistricting plan in October that essentially flipped precincts 3 and 4, meaning a new commissioner will serve most residents of northern and western Harris County. Although Harris County goes through redistricting every 10 years to ensure reasonably equal precinct populations, this most recent plan – which Commissioner Cagle opposed – was unprecedented in scope and disrupted the precincts of more than 2.3 million residents.
 
How does this affect me?
 
Most western Harris County residents will now be served by Precinct 4 Commissioner R. Jack Cagle. Precinct 3 Commissioner Tom S. Ramsey’s precinct was moved to northern and northeastern Harris County.
 
Commissioner Cagle prides himself on public service. Precinct 4 residents can request assistance or road repairs by contacting Precinct 4’s Community Assistance Department. For more information, please visit hcp4.net/assistance. Constituents may also call 832-927-4444 or email service@hcp4.net.
 
When will my precinct change?
 
New boundary lines are already in effect, but Precinct 4 should be fully active in your community by March 31.
 

Discover Something New in Precinct 4

New programs are on the way to a park or community center near you. Imagine waking up for an early morning hike, taking a bus ride to a museum, attending a nature talk outdoors, and ending the day with a movie in the park. In Precinct 4, it’s all possible.
 
We offer movie nights under the stars in spring, summer, and fall at parks throughout western Harris County. Come early to participate in a themed craft. We’ll also provide a variety of free seasonal festivals and live performances throughout the year. Stay tuned for updates.
 
Are you 50 or older? Precinct 4 offers bus trips to locations across southeast Texas, including museums, festivals, seasonal festivities, plays, musical performances, and more. Transportation is free, and many ticketed events are discounted. Visit one of our community centers to participate.
 
Wondering how to stay updated on all the new events in your area? Visit us online at hcp4.net/events for a preview of upcoming events. You can also stay updated by following us on InstagramFacebook, and Twitter or signing up for our publications here.
 

Park Spotlight
Kleb Woods Nature Preserve & Center

 
Looking for your next outdoor adventure? Kleb Woods Nature Preserve & Center features more than 3 miles of paved and natural trails through 133 acres of pine forests, wetlands, and a remnant prairie.
 
Before becoming a preserve, the property was prairie and farmland owned by the Kleb family. Elmer Kleb, who lived on the property from his birth in 1907 until his death in 1999, spent decades transforming the sparse farmland into a forested preserve. Now a thickly canopied forest, the preserve includes loblolly pine, Shumard oak, water oak, live oak, eastern red cedar, sugarberry, and pecan trees.
 
Harris County bought the land in 1991 to create a nature preserve, center, and heritage farm. Visitors can now explore the old Kleb homestead and blacksmith shop by appointment and view historical farm equipment. The park is also a popular birding destination featuring sparrows, wrens, blackbirds, mockingbirds, thrushes, robins, and waxwings. Camping is also available to Scouts.
 
Visit the Park at 20303 Draper Road in Tomball. For more information, visit https://www.hcp4.net/parks/kleb-woods/.
 

Who Maintains Your Roads?

 
One of the primary duties of a county commissioner is to plan, build, and maintain roads and bridges.
 
Precinct 4’s Road & Bridge Department responds to thousands of service requests each year. Residents can request mowing along county rights-of-way and medians, road repairs, ditch and drain clearing, tree trimming, trash removal, and other services along county-maintained roadways.
 
To pay for these services, Precinct 4’s Road & Bridge Department relies on mobility funds from your tax dollars. Mobility funds are used for the study, design, construction, maintenance, repair or operation of roads, streets, highways, or other related facilities.
 
The current formula for distributing most of the mobility funds is based on road miles. A portion of those funds, called METRO funding, is split equally among the precincts.
 

Who Builds Your Roads?

 
Precinct 4’s Infrastructure Division manages new traffic improvement projects each year, including road expansion projects, traffic signals, intersection improvements, and traffic management systems.
 
What are the funding sources?
 
The Infrastructure Division receives funding from METRO , the Harris County Toll Road Authority, and a 2015 road bond issue. METRO funds, which are based on the sales tax revenue the county receives from the Metropolitan Transit Authority, are used for the construction and maintenance of streets, bridges, traffic control signals, sidewalks, trails, and drainage improvements within METRO’s service area. These funds are split equally among Harris County’s four precincts.
 
The Infrastructure Division also seeks grants or partnerships with other agencies to stretch its budget. These organizations include the state Department of Transportation, municipalities, local utility districts, communities, and homeowners associations. Funding for sidewalks, school zone flashing warning signals, and traffic signals near schools is derived from the Child Safety Fund.
 
Want to learn more? Visit hcp4.net/infrastructure.
 

Precinct 4 Presents Twelfth Night

 
There’s always something to do in Precinct 4. Attend Precinct 4’s Shakespeare Festival on Saturday, April 9, from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Spring Creek Park to enjoy family friendly events and live performances of William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.
 
 
Can’t make it to the festival? Live performances are scheduled all weekend long at Spring Creek Park:
 
Friday, April 8, at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 9, at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, April 10, at 2 p.m.
 
Performances continue:
 
Friday, April 22, at 7:30 p.m. at the Tracy Gee Community Center
Friday, April 29, at 7:30 p.m. at the Steve Radack Community Center
 
Filled with romance, comedy, and action, Twelfth Night enchants as twins Viola and Sebastian deal with the aftermath of a devastating shipwreck. Alone in a strange land, Viola disguises herself as a man to secure a position in the household of Duke Orsino. The plot thickens when Viola finds herself fending off the affections of the beautiful Lady Olivia. When Sebastian arrives in town, chaos and comedy ensue, leading to hijinks and a double dose of mistaken identity
 
Visit Spring Creek Park at 15012 Brown Road in Tomball and the Tracy Gee Community Center at 3599 Westcenter Drive in Houston.
By |2022-02-15T16:58:02-06:00February 15th, 2022|News|0 Comments

Share This Story, Choose Your Platform!

About the Author:

Go to Top